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  • 2.1.1-COTTON VALUE ADDITION-VARIETIES

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  • Varieties

    Chapter 2 - Cotton value addition - Impact of varieties and production practices 

     
     
    Fibre quality factors such as length, uniformity, micronaire, strength, short fibre content, neps and seedcoat fragments may differ dramatically for varieties grown under nearly identical conditions. Except for colour and leaf grade, differences in fibre quality characteristics as measured by the High Volume Instrument (HVI) classification system for cotton and other instruments are greater than the differences caused by ginning systems. Cotton variety also affects neps, seed coat fragments, and short fibre content more than gins. Gins do affect leaf grade more than variety, but hairy-leaf varieties generally produce less desirable leaf grades than smooth-leaf varieties. Thus, variety selection is the key to meeting fibre quality demands.

    Field weathering affects most quality factors by weakening and discolouring the fibre. Fibre colour is substantially affected by weather and length of exposure to weather conditions after the bolls open. In fact, variety and excessive weathering have a far greater effect on fibre quality than do the most rigorous of gin processes.